Across the Atlantic: Journalism++ opens its first chapter outside of Europe

Bildschirmfoto 2015-02-27 um 16.55.22

Journalism++, the data journalism agency, opens its first chapter outside of Europe: Jornalismo++ São Paulo, also the first data journalism agency in Brazil. The Brazilian office will strenghthen current data journalism teams and lead projects of data-storytelling for news media organisations in the region, adding up to J++’s portfolio of award winning projects such as Datawrapper, Detective.io and Broken Promises.

Brazilian newsrooms are catching up to the data journalism revolution, although most of them still don’t have the resources to hire professionals from different backgrounds, such as Computer and Data Science, Design and Social Network Analysis, to lead data-driven investigations. Jornalismo++ São Paulo is an effort to fill this gap with a handpicked team of experts with an extensive experience in major Brazilian newsrooms and data journalism projects. “We want to bring data journalism to Brazil, helping newsrooms that want to do good journalism with data, but don’t have the manpower to do it in the short term”, says Marco Túlio Pires, journalist and programmer, one of the founders of the chapter in São Paulo.

Besides Marco Túlio Pires, who also coordinates School of Data Brazil, the team in São Paulo is lead by four other professionals: Juan Torres, editor of city’s desk at the Correio newspaper, the biggest in Salvador; Natália Mazotte, teacher assistant at the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas and also School of Data Brazil coordinator; Tiago Mali, Training Director at Brazil’s Association for Investigative Journalism; and Thomaz Rezende, who worked as a programmer and designer for VEJA Magazine.

The name of the agency is a pun between a common operator in programming languages and journalism itself. “The operator ‘++’ means ‘plus one’ to a certain numeric variable. In other words, we want Jornalismo++ to go beyond traditional journalism, even beyond what’s already on the web. In our work, we increment journalism with skills from other areas, such as Computer Science, Design and Data Analysis”, explains Natália.

Jornalismo++ São Paulo will also maintain a blog about Data Journalism with the latest updates in the field for a Portuguese-speaking audience. For more information about J++ São Paulo visit their website:

Open Spending: Tracking Financial Data worldwide

If you have followed the activites of the OKFN these last years, you probably already know Open Spending, the community-driven project initiated in 2007 and which has considerably grown since then. First, the idea started with Where Does My Money Go?, a database for UK public financial data, financed by the 4IP (4 Innovation for the Public) fund of the British channel 4. Few years later in 2011, the initiative has been internationalized and Open Spending was born, a worldwide platform which has largely gone beyond the British borders. Today, the site shows data from 73 countries from Bosnia to Uganda and the visualisation tool Spending Stories could be developed at the same time, thanks a grant from the Knight Foundation. Talking about funding, not to forget the Open Society Foundations which supports the community building work and the Omidyar Network which funded the research behind the report “Technology for Transparent and Accountable Public Finance”. You guessed it? Everything is Open Source.

OpenSpending_web

Open Spending consists not only in aggregating worldwide public financial data as budgets, spending, balance sheets, procurement or employees salaries; giving information on how public money has been spent all over the world and in your own city. It allows users to visualise directly the available data via Spending Stories and add new datasets as well. The community members making use of the tools and developing them show various backgrounds and every one is invited to join. Additionally, articles are regularly posted on the blog to incite to share knowledge each other.

The results so far are very good since numerous administrations and media have already used the visualisations, as the city of Berlin and the Guardian for instance. But besides them, independent journalists, activists from the civil society, students and engaged citizens take also avantage of the datasets, allowing a better understanding on public money.

Bildschirmfoto vom 2014-12-03 18:19:44           TheGuardian

Analysing journalistic data with detective.io

detectiveioNo doubt, the power of the internet has changed profoundly the way in which journalists gather their information. To keep up with the growing amount of data digitally available, more and more tools for data-journalists are being developed. They help facing the challenge of handling vast amounts of data and the subsequent extraction of relevant information (here you can find our little collection of useful tools).

One powerful tool is detective.io, a platform that allows you to store and mine all the data you have collected on a precise topic. Developed by Journalism++, a Berlin- and Paris-based agency for data-journalism, it was launched one year ago.

By now, several investigations that used the tool have made headlines in Europe, amongst others The Belarus Network, an investigation about Belarus’ president Alexander Lukashenko and the country’s elite affairs by French news channel France24, and, most notably, The Migrants Files, a database on the more than 25,000 migrants who have died on their way to Europe since 2000. According to the developers at Journalism++, the applied methodology, measuring the actual casualty rate per migration route – has now been picked up by UNHCR and IOM. Another example is a still ongoing investigation on police violence, started by NU.nl, the main news website in the Netherlands.

What does detective.io do?

Basically, detective.io lets you upload and store your data and search relationships in it bywith a graph search using some network analyses. The tool, which is open source and still a beta version, structures and maps relationships between subjects of an investigation. This can be a vast number of entities such as organizations, countries, people and events.

In its basic version, the tool offers three generic data schemes that help structuring the data you have – for instance on a corporate network, the respective ownerships, branches, individuals involved and so on. To deal with more complex datasets, a customized data scheme is needed. There is no need for special skills to use detective.io but one needs to think hard about what elements of information are needed for the analysis before creating the data structure. However, such custom data schemes are not included in the basic version. The team at Detective.io offers several paid plans that include additional and/or customized data schemes and respective customer support.

There are special offers for NGOs and investigative journalists, too.

Open Steps Directory - Detective.io 2014-11-09 13-56-12One powerful asset of detective.io is that investigations can be shared with collaborators and/or made public. Here you can have a look at what our Open Knowledge Directory looks like on detective.io and explore the relations of organizations and individuals by using the graph search.

Currently, the developers at Journalism++ are working on a new GUI/frontend for detective.io that will allow every user to edit the data schemes by themselves.

Here you can request an account for the beta version and if you are interested to collaborate in the development of detective.io, you can find the tool’s GitHub here.

Infogr.am Ambassador Eva Constantaras helps Kenyan journalists explain lag in development in data driven way

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For four days, 14 journalists from North Rift Kenya came together for a data journalism workshop led by Internews data journalism trainers Eva Constantaras and Dorothy Otieno. They investigated how to produce more in-depth stories on health and education topics through data journalism.

We were happy to contribute free Infogr.am Pro accounts to participants who went on to produce their own data visualisations following the training. The distance from Kenya’s open data community in Nairobi makes it challenging for journalists from rural areas to produce data stories after such workshops because of access to data, trainers and editors, who provide the training, mentoring and support needed to produce data journalism.

Here are some of the outcomes:

Michael W. Odhiambo (@mowesonga), a correspondent for the Standard, explored data on education levels in his county and the constituencies within it. He found that one constituency was pulling up the average for the entire county and the rest lagged behind. He is currently looking into whether the public budget for maternal healthcare is adequate for the treatment of complications such as fistulas.

Caleb Kemboi (@drkemboi) a journalist with Thomson Reuters explored a dataset that measured basic literacy and numeracy skills among school-age children. His visualisation focuses on the lowest performing constituencies in the region. His current investigations seeks to identify the reasons behind the school drop out rate among girls in the North Rift Region.

Joshua Cheloti (@CeejayCheloti) is a radio journalist with Biblia Husema Broadcasting, a radio station in Eldoret. His visualisation identifies a correlation between hostile environments and poor performance on numeracy and literacy exams.


Cheloti is committed to human interest reporting.  He said, “Before the training I feared stories involving data, but now I enjoy such stories as I can professionally analyse the data and use it to come up with a radio story that can easily be understood by my audience.” His next investigation looks at rising cases of chronic diseases in North Rift and the funds and facilities to treat them.

Each of the 14 participants will develop one data-driven story over the next month with a special focus on simplifying numbers, understanding the source of the data and putting breaking health and education stories into context using data.  They will also participate in a follow up training to see what questions their own investigations raised and which data they can use to develop health and education beat reporting.

About Eva:

Eva Constantaras (@evaconstantaras) is the Internews Data Journalism Advisor and specialises in cross-border journalism projects to combat corruption and encourage transparency. She has managed projects and reported from across Latin America, Asia and East Africa on topics ranging from displacement and kidnapping by organised crime networks to extractive industries and election violence.  Her reporting has appeared in media outlets including El Mundo and El Confidencial in Spain and the Seattle Times and El Tiempo in the Americas.

Infogr.am Ambassador Program:

Infogr.am Ambassadors bring the power of data visualisation to journalists, activists, communication officers, university students and classroom teachers all over the world. The network is designed to enhance data literacy while also encourage the knowledge sharing between the program members. Interested to join? Ask [email protected] for more details.

Visualising Daily Traffic in Santiago metro

Santiago metro is one of the main transportation system for its 6.5 millions inhabitants. A data visualization of the average daily traffic density in Santiago metro, made by Data Publica and Inria Chile, helps understand better how the daily traffic is organized in Santiago.

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This is an interactive data visualization (Dataviz) showing the traffic in Santiago metro of an average working day, for each half-an-hour of the day. The traffic density is measured by the number of people getting in the metro. The data was found on the Chilean government’s Open Data portal: datos.gob.cl.

It shows where passengers come from, regardless of where they’re going and what connections they could have made during their trip. The size of a circle is proportionate to the number of people getting in the corresponding station, and the ranking buttons add up all the data of the day/morning/afternoon.

As expected, more entries into the metro have been registered in areas with a high density of corporations or universitary zones: Santiago Centro, Providencia, Las Condes. However, the station registering the most entries is surprisingly a station far from the center: La Cisterna, with an average of 74.133 entries a day.

The only data available to measure the traffic density is the number of people entering in each station, which had originally been published by the Subsecretary to Transports (a department of the Chilean Transport and Telecommunication Ministry). A lot of interesting data is still missing, for instance the number of people getting out a station, the number of combinations in main hubs (like Baquedano), the number of people taking a bus before or after taking the metro, etc.

To estimate the number of people getting in a specific metro station, the Ministry used a Origin-to-Destination Matrix of working day trips built up by the Universidad de Chile. The sample was taken in a regular working week (Monday to Friday) of April 2012.

To estimate the average number of entries for each half-an-hour, data of every day of the week was added and then divided by 5, the total number of working days a week.

The Ministry of Transport’s datasets were combined with the following one: Feed GTFS de Transantiago, in order to have the geographical position of each station. The geographical coordinates of the whole Santiago zone were obtained here.

Thanks to the map, and especially the sum of passengers during the day/afternoon/morning, it is possible to identify residential areas (more passengers in the morning) and working districts (more passengers in the afternoon). The traffic density is indeed higher in business districts such as Santiago Centro (Universidad de Chile and Los Héroes stations) and Providencia/Las Condes (Tobalaba, Pedro de Valdivia, Escuela Militar, Manquehue stations). The traffic density is also lower in the other districts of Santiago, for they are mainly residential.

It is also a tool to identify some unexpected hubs. For instance, La Cisterna station is rather far from the center, but it is still registering the most important number of entries of the whole metro system! It can be concluded that it is a hub within an important bus network, covering the whole south-eastern part of Santiago.

This article has been translated by its author Louis Leclerc from Spanish into English. The original article in Spanish can be found here.

Meeting @ Cargografías, Buenos Aires, Argentina

DSCF7160Matter of fact, most of the experts and participants gathered in hackathons and events around Open Data / Open Government come from the IT or media scene. But Open Data and Open Government are not a private club for coders and journalists. You might give your two cents whatever you do. Designers are also part of the hacktivists initiating and developing such projects. And we have enjoyed so much exploring this perspective through the work of Andrés Snitcofsky.

Captura-de-pantalla-2013-10-23-a-las-15.27.59Both graphic designer and professor of heuristics at the University of Buenos Aires, Andrés had the idea in September 2011 to build what became later on Cargografías, an interactive time-line visualisation of the highest positions from the Argentinian political sphere. Users can search by position or name to explore and easily understand how the political framework is structured, what are the relations between the different positions at the power and how the higher politicians have been replaced along the years. The idea arose in the context of the Argentina’s economic crisis in 2011 and, although time was too short to fix it for the presidential elections in October 2011, the tool was finally achieved and revealed to be very useful during the next campaign of 2013.

The project got developed within the group of Hacks/Hackers Buenos Aires (HHBA), created at the same time in 2011 and which counts nowadays nearly 2500 members, the biggest local group in Latin America of the international grassroots journalism organization. With other members of HHBA, Andrés collected the raw data, researching on wikipedia or scrapping the information from other relevant sources before sorting it out manually into spreadsheets. The actual version 2.0. is the result of this collaboration and, even if it already represents a great piece of work, some updates are needed and new features could be added to extend the current capabilities. The users’ feedback, set as a participative function, help to point out what could be improved and also which contents have to be completed.

The initial team has sadly been changed and Andrés is now looking for a developer to implement the next version. This is a call for a coder! Cargografías will be released as Open Source as soon as some help (no matter from Argentina or not) will be found, since the tool is definitely worth to be replicated in further countries and political contexts.

Mapping Open Data with CartoDB @ Madrid/New York, Spain/USA

logos_full_cartodb_lightIf you have been following Open Steps, you know that a great part of the project consists on running a workshop on Open Data visualisation in the different cities visited. In these sessions, after going through some theory, we get hands on and teach how geo-referenced datasets can be represented on a map. We wanted to teach an easy but powerful tool that could be used by everyone, so we chose CartoDB. And it was a good choice!

Greatly based on Open Source software, this online platform has been conceived to serve journalists, designers, scientists and a large etcetera in the task of creating beautiful and informative interactive maps. The developers behind the tool had Open Data in mind since the first days and fact is that importing and visualizing datasets couldn’t be easier and faster. In addition, great features such as dynamic visualizations, support for your favourite Open Data formats and the endless possibilities of its Javascript API allow beginners but also big organisations (NASA, The Guardian, National Geographic among others) to tell stories with numbers.

Andrew Hill, member of the team, took some time and answered our questions about the creation and philosophy of the tool, its Open Source core and the importance of Open Data for educational, scientific and social development. We invite you to find out more about CartoDB here:

1) Hi Andrew, can you introduce yourself briefly and explain us what CartoDB is?

Hi, I’m the senior scientist at Vizzuality and CartoDB. CartoDB is our online mapping platform that we built to let people make beautiful interactive maps easily.

2) Your company, Vizzuality, is based between Madrid and New York. What is the story behind its creation? Besides CartoDB, are you working on other products or have other activities?

Vizzuality was created by our co founders, Sergio Alvarez and Javier de la Torre, both from Madrid. Our first office was in Madrid where we started to grow the company. It wasn’t until a couple years later that Javier and I moved to New York to start the office here. The idea was just to grow and explore new collaborations.

Right now, our biggest focus by far is CartoDB. There is a lot of innovation around maps on the web right now and we are really enjoying contributing to it. CartoDB has become more than we could ever have imagined and now we can see so many ways to keep making it more incredible, so I’m sure we’re going to be focused on it for some time to come.

3) Let’s focus on CartoDB, since it is the tool we are teaching on our workshop. Who is currently using it? Journalists, designers, developers? Can you point us to remarkable projects making use of all the possibilities the tool has to offer?

Yeah, all of those people, plus students, governments, city planners, nonprofits, you name it :)

Sure, I think one of the best places to find recent examples is our blog or on Twitter. Some highlights include:

http://illustreets.co.uk/

http://clearstreets.org/

http://here.com/livingcities/

Twitter has been using us for a lot of quick visualizations

http://projects.aljazeera.com/2013/syrias-refugees/index.html

http://sweeten.com/maps

and many more…

4) CartoDB, as the rest of your products, is based on open source software and its code is released to the public domain. What is your motivation behind this decision? For your company and the development of your products, what is the impact of choosing an Open Source license?

We have always been committed open source. Largely it has to do with our background as a scientific company, working with and interacting with scientific research it seemed obvious to us that science benefits greatly from open source. Not only does it benefit from it, it almost seems irresponsible to do anything else.

With the importance of maps in society, I feel it also seems irresponsible to rely on black boxes for mapping. CartoDB doesn’t hide anything from you, it is there for you to criticize, improve or change as you need.

5) As we know, Open Source does not necessary exclude commercial products. What is the business-model for your products?

We offer a lot of incentives on top of our hosted service. Including our caching, backups, uptime, maintenance, upgrades, etc. With paid hosting plans you also get dedicated support and access to the foremost experts of CartoDB to help you become a better mapper, data visualization expert, or GIS expert on our platform. So there is a lot of benefits that using our hosted platform can bring to businesses and individuals and we are seeing already that businesses are being built around that, it feels great.

6) Let’s talk about the community around CartoDB. Do you receive feedback from users or from developers to improve the tool? How important is for an Open Source-based product to count with such contributions?

We have received a lot of feedback from our users including feature requests. We also do our best to contribute to the open source libraries that are used by CartoDB, so it is very much a community effort and that community is what makes it all possible for sure.

7) On our workshop, we teach how to import and visualise Open Data with CartoDB. Is the tool specially thought to be used with Open Data? In your opinion, why does Open Data and its visualisation matter?

We think about open data when developing CartoDB all the time. I wouldn’t say that is the sole target of our tool development, a lot of private companies are using CartoDB to analyse and map data that is part of a business offering, so not open. However, we think that visualizing open data can be a very powerful method of educating and demonstrating it’s contents and importance. The title of a recent article about some maps I created shows that I’m not alone in thinking that.

8) We recently saw that you have released great new features (dynamic visualisation, live data feeds,…). How do you set the priorities of the features you are developing? What are the next features you are working on? And in general, how does the future for CartoDB look like?

I’d say we balance three things as best we can when going for new features in CartoDB: what users express they want or need, what we see as improvements that can be made in performance, simplicity or design, and functionality that we see as innovations that we hope users will love :)

Thanks Andrew!

 

Meeting @ Open Development Cambodia , Phnom Penh, Cambodia

ODC-LogoIf you happen to search for Open Data initiatives in Cambodia, Open Development Cambodia is definitely going to appear on the top of the results list. Started in 2011 as a project under the activities of the EWMI and on the way to be registered as a NGO, ODC represents the most active effort in the South-East-Asian country to collect, use and share data for social improvement.

With a strong philosophy of objectivity and independence, the team does not focus on advocacy in particular sectors nor does it pursue any agenda, other than aggregating and offering information to the public in easily accessible forms. Self-defined as an intersection between NGO, media platform, and think-thank, ODC concentrates its resources on aggregating data (which necessarily must be already available somewhere in the public domain) and creating objective briefings, maps, and graphics available for everyone to download, analyse and re-use. Sources are quoted and even the methodology they employed to create these contents is transparent and can be found on their site. That is what can be understood as an open way of working.

Bildschirmfoto 2014-01-08 um 15.35.44Among other contents, we learned about their forest cover page. At the heart of the page are animated forest cover change maps developed based on analysis of satellite imagery released in public domain by NASA. These maps and accompanying graphics provides information about the extent and rate of Cambodia’s forest cover change over the past 40 years. This and other information found on the site has been already used by NGOs, bloggers, journalists, researchers, grassroots groups, rights advocates and even government technocrats and investors to inform their research, reporting, analysis, and planning. As an example, the local rights-focused website SITHI.org uses maps from ODC as base layers on which they add other analysis. An interesting statistic: since its creation, their website has counted visits from users from almost every country and state of the world, although the majority of users are Cambodians.

All this, in a country whose administration is not particularly supportive when it comes to releasing data to the public domain or sharing information with its citizens. It is important to note that there is currently no Freedom of Information laws in Cambodia, even an attempt to pass a draft law was rejected in January 2013. At the time we are writing these lines, there is no Open Data platform initiated or planned by the government.

PRAJ2Jul2013bHowever, the remarkable work of organisations such as ODC and the presence of a newly created local chapter of the OKFN are examples of the current will to fill the gap and realise a positive development of openness and transparency for Cambodia. Talking about what is to come, ODC team will add interesting new features on their platform, such as and API, to improve user experience and more effective access to their aggregated datasets. The site will also be available in Khmer language within the next few months.

Meeting & Workshop with KLP @ CIS, Bangalore, India

klp_mapThe last organisation we have met in Bangalore is the Karnataka Learning Partnership (KLP), an initiative launched in 2007 by the Akshara Foundation, which collects, analyses and visualises data to improve primary education in Karnataka. By browsing its website, users can find a very elaborated map and reports containing information on public primary schools. Position, availability of sanitation facilities, demographic and nutrition statistics are the kind of datasets that are being presented. Among others, public officials are making use of this material for the improvement of the decision-making process. The data comes from various sources: public administration, collaborating organisations and volunteer surveys too. Since these information is also relevant for parents, who most of them don’t have access to online resources, KLP is working on a SMS/phone based methodology for them to access the data. The results have been already proven to be really successful and the future plans include the expansion of the number of districts covered, currently 3. We invite you to watch the following video to experience more about it:

We met Gautam John, Head of KLP, former lawyer who actively works in the educational sector and initiated also Pratham Books, a non-profit publishing house that uses Creative Commons licenses to further distribution, translation and reuse of children’s books.

Together with him, we organised our event at the Centre for Internet and Society, which is a non-profit research organisation in Bangalore that works on numerous relevant issues like freedom of expression, accessibility for persons with disabilities, access to knowledge, intellectual property rights reform and openness; engaging in academic research on digital natives and digital humanities.

frameAn intense open debate characterized our workshop and many of the around twenty participants had ongoing projects to show as example of smart use of data. Most of them are indeed active members of the datameet group, the indian-wide online forum that we have already mentioned in our previous articles. We experienced about projects like theballot.in, a weekly online data publication which presents political facts and figures about the world’s largest democracy by using richly illustrated graphs and charts. Also, we could learn more about the Indian Water Portal, an organisation with a deep understanding on how to use data to improve water management; and even one member of TacticalTech talked about their activities we have recently covered. However, there were attendees who are still working on the initial phase of their projects, in areas such as the fight against sexual harassment or the improvement of waste management at neighbourhood level. Those were specially interested in topics as data collection or how to face challenges like the lack of data or citizen engagement. It was for sure an interesting session!

With this productive event, we put an end to our busy week in Bangalore. We are happy to have met such passionate activists and learned so much from them!

Update: Here you can watch the video of the theoretical part of our presentation. Not complete, apologies for that…

[vimeo]https://vimeo.com/81172590[/vimeo]

Meeting & Workshop @ Transparent Chennai, Chennai, India

Bildschirmfoto 2013-10-26 um 21.12.33Transparent Chennai is a project that was started three years ago with the aim to improve the quality of data used for urban governance in Chennai, and present it in ways that help people understand and use the data for planning, monitoring, and for making claims on the government. It is housed in the Centre for Development Finance (CDF), one of three centres for research at IFMR, a business school in Chennai. This small group of researchers, mostly women, does a great job aggregating, creating and disseminating data and research about important civic issues facing the city of Chennai, including those issues facing the poor. Quoting their website: „Our work aims to empower residents by providing them useful, easy-to-understand information that can better highlight citizen needs, shed light on government performance, and improve their lives in the city.“

We met researchers Satyarupa Shekhar and Vinaya Padmanabhan, who explained Transparent Chennai’s ongoing research. In few words, their work consists on researching and collecting data with a focus on: slums and informal settlements, solid waste management, walkability and pedestrian infrastructure, and water and sanitation. A great part of this collected information is accessible in an aggregated form through the interactive map which users can find on their website.

The way they collect this data represents a laborious and passionate task. Depending on the project, they work with local residents or call for volunteers to conduct citizen surveys. They collaborate with other citizens groups and civil society organisations, and work closely with the local administration, which provides them with first-hand data. As you can read on their blog, they work closely with residents and that enables them to develop a better understanding of the problems and actual needs of the population of the city, who is at the end the one who will benefit from the output of their action.

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One successful case is the recent study about the current state and optimal location of public toilets. The results of this research are going to help the municipality to define an efficient strategy for the construction of new sanitation facilities.

Another project that showed the impact of their smart use of data: by conducting surveys, they could map the location of homeless people in different neighbourhoods of Chennai and contrasted it with the position of the existing shelters. Through this research, they could find relevant inconsistencies and propose a better distribution in order to improve the quality of life of this group of less fortunate citizens.

And Open Data? Does Transparenct Chennai release the collected data as open? We obviously formulated this question during our meeting. On the Database Section in their website, you can find some of the data sets they have generated so far. Also, and without leaving the Open Data topic, we experienced that they are participating in the Exploring the Emerging Impacts of Open Data in Developing Countries (ODDC) project. This study, led by the World Wide Web Foundation, has the goal of understanding how open data is being put to use in different countries and contexts across the developing world.

DSCF8971After this enriching exchange, we could present our workshop counting with around 15 attendees from different areas: representant of the region Tamil Nadu, Open Source activists, students, members of research institute and renewable energy initiatives,… From the beginning on, the audience showed a big interest in the data collection methodology and data visualisation tools. Many projects were mentioned during the closing discussion. For example, the results of the national rural employment programme conducted by the indian Ministry of Rural Development, which can be visualised online and downloaded as CSV file since last week only.

Finally, we were asked whether we were going to pass by Bangalore. Indeed, the capital of the Karnataka region is well known in India for being the headquarters of many Open initiatives and the participants pointed us many organisations and individuals we could meet there. For sure! Bangalore was already on our schedule and it seems that we will experience a lot there. We expect to arrive around mid november and will keep you updated!